NCAA Division I Council Recommends legislation for name, image and, likeness

The NCAA has taken another step closer to allowing student-athletes to profit off their name, image, and likeness. The Division I council recommended legislation to be voted upon in the next legislative cycle. 

The NCAA has been slow to respond to the call for athletes receiving payments for play since they were placed under pressure after California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law the Fair Pay to Play Act in September of 2019. 

The move by the Division I Council is a step in the right direction for the NCAA and its student-athletes. 

The vote will take place in January 2021 and, if passed, athletes will be allowed to receive the following:

  • “Allow student-athletes to use their name, image and likeness to promote camps and clinics, private lessons, their own products and services, and commercial products or services.”
  • “Allow student-athletes to be paid for their autographs and personal appearances.”
  • “Allow student-athletes to crowdfund for nonprofits or charitable organizations, catastrophic events and family hardships, as well as for educational expenses not covered by cost of attendance.”
  • “Allow student-athletes the opportunity to use professional advice and marketing assistance regarding name, image and likeness activities, as well as professional representation in contract negotiations related to name, image and likeness activities, with some restrictions.”
  • “Prohibit schools from being involved in the development, operation or promotion of a student-athlete’s business activity, unless the activity is developed as part of a student’s coursework or academic program.”
  • “Prohibit schools from arranging or securing endorsement opportunities for student-athletes.”

With an opportunity to profit off of their name, image, and likeness, this is another big win for collegiate sports and its athletes. Time will tell if this decision will harm collegiate sports, but more than likely not much will change. The biggest benefit of this decision may be fewer opportunities for the NCAA’s strict rules and policies to affect the players and programs.

A full press release can be found at NCAA.org.

Feature Image Credit: Duke Men’s Basketball (@DukeMBB)

 

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